Brian Campbell's Housebike


http://bikeportland.org/2006/11/10/motorhome-bike-makes-portland-appearance/ as of 2010/03/13

Motorhome bike makes Portland appearance

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) on November 10th, 2006 at 9:39 am

BikePortland.org reader Bob Crispin sent in these photos after seeing this wayward pedaler on the streets of Northeast Portland.

[motorhomebikeFullView.jpg]  

Amazingly, the guy claims to have ridden this contraption all over the U.S. and down to Mexico. According to Bob,

He said his design was inspired by the moon rovers and the moon landing vehicle, the super structure and the shiny panels. The interior was sweet too, looked comfy, and had a map holder and lots of neat nooks and crannies to store stuff.
[motorhomebikeGuypeeking.jpg]   [Snug as a bug]

This thing just blows me away. Bob says the guy talked like a serious engineer, had been on the road for several years and that the bike was very well built, and even “appeared to be light given what it was.”

The craziest thing is that despite days of torrential rain, Bob said it was dry inside the cabin. Here are more photos (click image to enlarge): [motorhomebikeRearView.jpg]   [Rear view of the cabin] [motorhomebikeFrontView.jpg]   [The cockpit] [motorhomebike1.jpg]   [I'd be proud of it too!] Wow. You just never know what you’ll come across out there.


http://bikeportland.org/2006/11/28/motorhome-bike-guy-needs-our-help/ 2010/03

Updated: Motorhome bike guy needs our help

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) on November 28th, 2006 at 2:45 pm

Who will ever forget this guy? Not me. After my post a few weeks ago, I was amazed at how many people remembered seeing him. Readers chimed in from all over the country to say how impressed they were with the moxie and ingenuity behind this man and machine.

Well it turns out that Ryan (they man behind this amazing bike) needs our help. A reader contacted me with this follow-up information:

The designer/dweller’s name is Ryan Brian. The bike is indeed a fascinating and well-designed machine, but it’s got a couple of problems after many years on the road, and Ryan Brian could use a little bit of help from his bike-tinker bretheren in Portland.

Some of the styrofoam roofing-insulation panels in his roof have begun taking on water and are starting to house some fungus. If anybody has these kind of blue styrofoam panels lying around dry, Ryan Brian could really use them.

His front wheel is a mag wheel from a Puch moped with internal brake. He’s got plans to eventually replace it with a home- built mag wheel; I’m sure he’s got an excellent design, but he’s a little bit low on parts at the moment, and meanwhile the bearings are starting to fail. He was asking me where he might find moped parts in Portland — I had no idea. But if anybody has a moped front wheel lying around, or thinks they have replacement bearings for such a wheel, Ryan Brian might be able to use those parts.

He’s got ambitious plans to build another such “ship” — this one is his third! — but he’s low on scratch and materials.

Although his machine is impressively well-designed, he says it’s showing its age and he’s not sure whether to repair or replace at this point. Nevertheless, it’s his home for the winter.

He said he doesn’t need much in the way of bike parts, but most of all any aluminum extrusion anybody can donate would be most welcome.

Most of all, Ryan Brian wants us to know that he designs and builds excellent bike ships, bike trailers, and other large bike cargo machines! If you were thinking of employing an iconoclastic engineer in that area, I’d suggest you talk to him! He will be based near 20th and SE Ankeney for a while, as he’s house-sitting for a friend who lives on that block. Drop by and say hi.

*Update: Another reader says Brian wants to build these bikes for others, and also build cargo versions for messengers and other interested parties. If anyone would like to contact Brian directly, please drop me a line at jonathan[at]bikeportland[dot]org.

Let’s help keep this guy rolling strong for many more years!


http://bikeportland.org/2007/08/30/beloved-motorhome-bike-torn-to-shambles-in-ne-portland/ as of 2010/03

Beloved motorhome bike “torn to shambles” in NE Portland

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) on August 30th, 2007 at 10:18 am

[motorhomebikeFullView.jpg]   Brian and his motorhome-bike before vandals destroyed it (see below). (Photo: Bob Crispin)

Last November, I shared photos and the story of an amazing character making his home on the streets of Portland.

His name is Brian and he lives in a bicycle that he expertly engineered into a human-powered bicycle Winnebago. According to reports, he has been pedaling this unique vehicle all over the world for over three decades.

He had been making his street-home on SE Ankeny Street (near Citybikes) but had recently moved to northeast Portland, just east of MLK Blvd off of NE Ainsworth.

Yesterday, Ayleen Crotty (who lives in the area) announced on her blog that Brian was looking for donations to help him with some much-needed renovations to the bike. Ayleen’s employer, OR Bike, had already chipped in $200 to the cause.

Unfortunately, this morning I received this sad news from a reader:

“…by 10pm [last night] it was torn to shambles. This morning it was still there and still in pieces. I do not know what happened (whether he did it himself or it was vandalized), but it’s a damn shame. I almost cried when I saw it.”

Someone else reported that yesterday evening they noticed, “a big hole in the side and the contents strewn everywhere.”

Here are photos of the damage sent in from Ayleen Crotty:

[motorhomeayleen1.jpg]   [motorhomeayleen2.jpg]   [motorhomeayleen3.jpg]   (Photos by Ayleen Crotty)

I haven’t yet confirmed what exactly happened, but it doesn’t sound good. I hope Brian can recover and I look forward to finding out how/if the community can step up and help him out. Please contact me or leave a comment if you have any information (or photos of the damage).

Stay tuned…


http://bikeportland.org/2007/08/30/update-on-camper-bike as of 2010/03

Updated: Motorhome-biker shares his story

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) on August 30th, 2007 at 8:12 pm [NOTE: This post has been updated since last night. Please hit your "refresh" button to make sure you are seeing the full story.]

[1282515666_a6599301f3.jpg]   Brian (Photos by Jonathan Maus)

Like most of you who read the story about how the famous motorhome-bike was destroyed Wednesday night, I instantly assumed it was the work of vandals.

But as the day wore on, evidence mounted that the bike’s creator, Brian, might have done it himself: a commenter who has spent time with him said he’d been wanting to “trash it and start from scratch”; Ayleen Crotty reported that he needed help with repairs; and Jonathon Severdia, who wrote an article about Brian for WorldChanging called to tell me he wouldn’t be surprised if Brian did it.

Despite all this, I didn’t want to jump to conclusions until I heard what happened directly from Brian.

Fortunately last night, on my way to catch the B:C:Clettes at the Clown House on Alberta, I happened to see Brian entering the Safeway at MLK Blvd. and NE Ainsworth.

“Nothing ever lines up for me, no jobs, no nothing... I’m invisible out here, like a ghost. People only notice me now that this happened.” –Brian

I felt awkward introducing myself to him. No matter what the circumstances are around his bike, I knew he might not be in the best mood right now. Not to mention, I was a complete stranger.

At the outset of our conversation, things did not look good. I quickly realized he had destroyed the bike himself and he was mumbling and going on about how sick and tired he was of everything: living on the street; living in his “camper”; not finding work; not having many friends; being hungry; and so on.

He didn’t really look me in the eye and he was angry, frustrated and depressed.

I let Brian know that while I couldn’t relate to his experiences, I could understand why he felt angry and bitter at the world. Mixed in with my empathy, I let him know that there was a community of people who cared about him and who were willing to help; but only if he wanted it.

As we walked back to the site of his tattered bike, the warm breeze blew the wayward pieces of tattered foam all over the street. He had a few plastic trash bags and I asked for one to help him clean up the mess.

As we picked up bits of glass, metal, and foam, the picture of Brian’s breakdown became clearer.

[1281654589_4084628345.jpg]  

After decades of traveling the country in his camper-bike and living a seemingly carefree, nomadic existence, Brian had had enough.

Still upset, he said, “Nothing ever lines up for me, no jobs, no nothing…I’m invisible out here, like a ghost. People only notice me now that this happened.”

I offered (and he agreed) that perhaps people mistakenly assumed he was happy and content with his existence. After all, he was free-and-clear, without the stresses of work, mortgages, and other rat-race responsibilities. He was on an eternal bike tour, living off the land under his own power…how bad could that be?

As we talked, many people would honk and wave as they drove by.

He explained that last winter he reached a breaking point. The dark, cold, wet days found him “just lying there, in my cabin, staring out, losing weight from not eating.” “I can’t do that anymore,” he said “I felt like I was in jail in that thing, trapped...”

He pointed out mold that was spreading through sections of the cabin’s foam walls and expressed concern about breathing it in.

Despite his anxieties over the state of his life, I noticed that the more we spoke, the more stable, and less upset he became. Slowly but surely the fog around his mood began to lift. Eventually the conversation turned to how he could get rolling again and he even started joking and smiling.

[1282516832_88d39c364a_o.jpg]   [1281654103_66c82667f7_o.jpg]  

With a huge grin he said, “This is what happens when you build a camper that’s not big enough for a woman.”

I told Brian that if he was interested, I would help him raise some money and maybe even have a little work party. He said he definitely wants to rebuild, “I can get this all fixed in just a couple of days.”

Staring at his bike and thinking of rebuilding, he said, “It will be like the big family argument that gets better when you buy a new car and everyone’s happy.”

That “joke” is actually a true story from Brian’s past. He told me about a “big blowout fight” between his mom and dad. Then, the next morning he noticed a brand new car in the driveway, and “the house was silent…and everyone seemed OK.” With a confused look and a sheepish grin, he said, “I could never figure that one out.”

I was relieved that his spirits seemed to be getting brighter. At this point, he was talking less of his frustrations and sadness, and more about how he could get rolling again.

Brian said he could re-build his camper for around $200 in supplies. Here’s a list of what he needs:

Before I left, I wrote my name and phone number down and told him to stay in touch (he said he would). I offered my backyard as a backup place to crash if he needed it (he’s currently got a place to stay that’s off the streets).

Then, at his request, I went to Safeway and bought him a 40 oz. of Pabst and two cans of spaghetti.

If I do hear from Brian, and if there’s sufficient interest from the community (which I think there will be), I will coordinate a work party to happen in the next few days. Stay tuned to this post for more details.

In the meantime, I’ve created this PayPal button for anyone who wants to make online donations. All proceeds will go to help Brian rebuild his bike (and maybe a show of support from the community will help him rebuild his zeal and outlook on life as well.)

UPDATE: As of today (8/31) at 4:15 pm, we have raised $515.00 for Brian. Wow. Stay tuned for more info…

UPDATE: We’ve set up a work party for tomorrow. If you’d like to join us, meet Brian, and show your support, come to the Walgreen’s parking lot at MLK Blvd. and NE Ainsworth at 3:00 tomorrow, on Saturday, 9/1.


http://bikeportland.org/2007/09/01/work-party-for-brian/ 2010/03

Work party for Brian

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) on September 1st, 2007 at 6:54 am

Come out and meet Brian, show your support, check out his camper-bike, and lend a hand to help us rebuild it.

Meet in the parking lot of Walgreens at NE Ainsworth and MLK Blvd.


http://flickr.com/photos/bikeportland/1408953075/in/photostream/ and http://flickr.com/photos/bikeportland/sets/72157601815592259/ as of 2008/02/12.

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http://www.culturechange.org/issue11/brian-campbell-house-bike.htm as of 2008/02

Culture Change
Nonprofit founded in 1988

Brian Campbell's House Bikes

by Randy Ghent

You've heard of house boats--but house bikes? Probably not. There's only 13 in the world that we at the Auto-Free Times know of. And Brian Campbell has built every one of them. Together they form what Campbell calls "the GeoFleet."

Each bike weighs 200 pounds, has 135 gears, and--once you get going--can go faster than a racing bike. It can even carry loads of 500 pounds, and is extremely strong and durable. Sound like too much to be true? There's more: One GeoFleet house bike, effectively replacing both the owner's house and car, can even provide economic security for less than $2,600. If used parts are relied upon, the bike can be built for under $500. So you can say goodbye to rent, insurance, pollution and the rest of it.

It's not exactly luxurious living--just a cozy weatherproof place to sleep, made of rigid urethane insulation, that's the width of a twin bed. But for the claustrophobic, the largest sleeper box available with GeoFleet's standard frame sleeps four. In fact, the sleeper box is so well insulated that the occupant's body heat keeps it warm all night long. "It's like the Bahamas within seconds, even in the winter," Campbell said, "though there's no condensation problem because of dehumidifying windows."

And with a unique double kickstand, the bike is remarkably stable. It won't budge, even with three people inside. Mostly aluminum angle bar bolted together, the bike's framework has long drive chains and sets of gears underneath that connect to a specially designed automobile wheel in the rear. The bike is driven partly by a turning, weighted mechanism that provides centrifugal-force power. So once you get going, it can feel like you're riding a two-pound bike, Campbell said. He calls it a "spring-action, thresher flywheel." "This mechanism uses the internal weight of the wheel itself--not where the wheel is hitting the road," Campbell claims. "It almost feels like you have a big ball of steel pushing behind you."

Campbell and a partner have even patented this design, as well as that of the drive chain. GeoFleet bikes are so unique that Campbell and his cohorts jokingly use Star Trek terminology to refer to them. They call the bikes "ships," and have assigned themselves titles such as "Captain" and "Admiral."

But Campbell has little desire to promote his product, prove his claims about it, or build a business out of his creation. In fact, he doesn't even have an address or telephone number.

After hitchhiking around the U.S. for 11 years, Campbell says the house bike idea came to him through "non-action, non-thinking power," which he combined with self-teachings in science and physics, having quit formal school in eighth grade. "The spirit of the Earth came and spoke to me, saying I'm not going to be like all the rest," recalled Campbell. "Before I started those bikes, I didn't accomplish one thing. I just barely ate, barely slept, and that's it." Now 40, Campbell has been building house bikes since 1984.

The geometric-structured frame design, made to hold weight from all sides, hasn't changed in seven years. At press time, Campbell is building GeoFleet's fourteenth house bike for the Auto-Free Times to use as a work bike and for demonstration purposes. The magazine will be unofficially joining what Campbell calls a "private club" of house bike owners.

Campbell's personal house bike holds all his possessions, and he is otherwise homeless, sometimes building bikes for others to raise food money. He views his bikes as a means to achieve financial independence and extricate oneself from poverty. He now has the freedom to take vacations at will--a freedom most car owners lack.

Thus Campbell's life calls into the question the idea that a high quality of life must result from a high monetary standard of living. He does quite well without what are usually a person's two most environmentally unfriendly possessions: a house and a car.

"I have never paid rent in my life," Campbell proudly asserted.

For more information about GeoFleet, or to have your own bike built, contact the Sustainable Energy Institute at 707-826-7775.

Culture Change mailing address: P.O. Box 4347 , Arcata , California 95518 USA Telephone 1-215-243-314


http://media.www.californiaaggie.com/media/storage/paper981/news/2003/11/14/FrontPage/Pedal.To.The.Metal-1315811.shtml 2008/02/13 Pedal to the metal
He lives anywhere his feet take him.
And he may not be in Davis much longer.

By: ZACHARY AMENDT
Issue date: 11/14/03
Section: Front Page

Brian Campbell sits inside of his bicycle home, which includes a stero, lighting and his bed, among other things. He made the vehicle himself and has used it to travel the country. Media Credit: Krysten Kellum / Aggie

Brian Campbell sits inside of his bicycle home, which includes a stero, lighting and his bed, among other things. He made the vehicle himself and has used it to travel the country. [Click to enlarge]

Brian Campbell lifts the kickstand on his bicycle in preparation to ride the Delta of Venus Cafe, one of the local hangouts where he says he feels welcome. He says that his bike has made him unwelcome at some other locations. Media Credit: Krysten Kellum / Aggie

Brian Campbell lifts the kickstand on his bicycle in preparation to ride the Delta of Venus Cafe, one of the local hangouts where he says he feels welcome. He says that his bike has made him unwelcome at some other locations. [Click to enlarge]

It has an automatic kickstand and a kitchen ? all the amenities a person needs to live like a portable Thoreau. For six years now, Brian Campbell has been living in his bicycle. "It's the ninth wonder of the world," he said. "There's nothing like it anywhere else." It's a sort of self-propelled RV for one, with 135 gears, weighing 620 pounds. It balances impressively on two wheels, has windows and a sliding cardboard door and looks more cumbersome and metallic than it rides. "It's heavy, but I can get it up like a big-block motorcycle," said Campbell. Patches of waterproof tape seal the cracks or flaws above Campbell's bed. Inside, there's enough room for him to sprawl out ? and bathe, when necessary. His body heat insulates the cabin from the approaching seasonal cold. Campbell, 46, hails from Pennsylvania. He taught himself mechanical engineering and has pedaled his home over 100,000 miles. Or so it reads on the back of his bicycle. Next to the mileage, written in marker, are the words "Quit Oil." Campbell said he's in a class of his own when he travels. He claims to be able to pedal his home at highway speeds. But he's also feeling persona non grata around the city. "I'm not feeling too welcome in a lot of places," he said. "I don't know where I'm going to stay tonight." That is, he doesn't know where he's going to park. "I've been staying over near the Co-op for a while now," he said. "Some of the homeless guys don't like me over there. They think I cut in on their action." Campbell's bicycle was vandalized last week. He worked odd construction jobs to earn the money to build the bike. Now, he needs to generate an income - or donations - to make repairs. "It takes nothing to keep it in shape," he said. "I've spent $400 in the six years I've had this thing just to keep it up and maintain it." Campbell has an idea to taxi students to and from campus in the coming winter months. "I can fit five or six students in here, have them pay a dollar each to ride to class," he said. Though he fears burning his bridges in Davis, Campbell said the residents of the Domes have embraced him as a model for clean living. "I'm the icon of the city," Campbell said. "Nothing stops me from going anywhere."


http://daviswiki.org/Brian_Campbell 2008/02/13 Brian is the creater, owner and sole resident of the famous Human Powered Housing Project. He's a really friendly guy and is a great person to strike up a conversation with. He's quite intelligent, after all he did conceive, engineer, and fabricate his own moveable house! He claims to be an "intergalactic refugee", though some may doubt this. He's a regular at Cafe Roma where he sometimes plays the piano for hours on end while his House sits parked outside. Brian comes and goes. Heck, if your house was moveable, would you keep it in one spot? No. Brian is often around Davis but he does travel near and far. Sometimes he goes on his spiffy bike but it does also get loaded in a truck on occasion. Recently, Brian took a trip down and back to somewhere in Mexico. In Vacaville, they let local school kids create their own newspaper once or twice a year, The Campus Star. Anyway, one kid wrote about Brian and his bike when he was living outside of the Vacaville or Fairfield Target in early 2005. This [WWW]aggie article from 2003 contains a bio of Brian. * One time I was in the backyard of the Charred Dog House at a House Show when I start talking to Brian. He starts talking about movies and TV shows that I have no idea about. And I realize how out of it I am for not watching TV when a guy that lives in his bike knows more about TV than I do. - RobRoy 2006-01-09 21:01:48 I first read about Brian in the Car Free Times long before I had heard of Davis, and I admired him as a hero and a visionary. Then one day after I moved here, I met him in the flesh, and with my admiration intact, now believe him to indeed be an intergalactic refugee, much like the red rain that came to earth in 2001 in Kerala, India. ChrisCongleton 2006-04-05 17:07:32 I talked to Brian today outside of Aggie Liquors. He said he's heading to Minnisota in a day or two and not likely to return to Davis. If you see him, give him a big goodbye. Truly a unique Davis charactor and will be missed. GrumpyoldGeek 2006-10-16 09:05:58 BonnieStewart sighted Brian and his house/bike on highway 101 near Garberville a couple of weeks ago. JimStewart
http://daviswiki.org/Human_Powered_Housing_Project 2008/02/13

The Human Powered Housing Project is a bike/RV contraption built and lived in by Brian Campbell. It's about fifteen feet long and is absolutely one of a kind. Brian rides around in style under a shade canopy while protected by a motorcycle like windshield. His house forms the back of the rig. It has windows, a slot for donations, a comfortable looking bed, shelves and everything else a normal person would want. When parked, the project sits on an incredibly sturdy kick stand because this is probably the heaviest bike that you've ever seen. It's made mostly out of materials that you can find at a hardware store. It looks like there are a lot of aluminum struts and foil tape. The back wheel is much larger than your average bike wheel but the front, while still homemade, looks more normal. The gear system is pretty beefy as well. This is at least the second Human Powered Housing Project to exist. Look below for a picture of an earlier prototype. Anyone know what this thing weighs?

He rents out rooms for $10/night. That's probably less than what you're paying for rent. Rooms? How many does it have? Has anyone ever done so?

On a related subject, Davis is world famous for its human-powered vehicles. There are even a few other bikes that are unique to Davis.

The [WWW]Winnebiko of "high-tech nomad" Steve Roberts was an earlier version of an all-in-one bicycle-centered environment.

As seen in the [WWW]Aggie.

Questions

Brian claims to be able to sustain 70-80 mph on the vehicle. He has told me how he does it, but I have not seen him go anywhere near that. Anyone know for a fact whether it is possible, and if so, whether he actually does it? -ChristopherMcKenzie

70-80 mph? Perhaps this may be the vehicle's terminal velocity after being ridden off the edge of a cliff ;-) More seriously, the top speed in a downhill-coast situation depends crucially on the vehicle's [WWW]drag coefficient (air friction). And the more drag there is, the more weight becomes a factor (heavier=faster). The Human Powered Housing Project is neither sleek nor heavy I would not bet on it in a [WWW]Soap Box Derby, but I would wager that in a wind-tunnel situation at 80mph, all that the foil tape you see would lose its grip on those foam panels! - E

That is when his front cow-catcher gets caught on the rear bumper of an 18-wheeler going down I-5.

I've seen a child's car which goes that fast. The speedometer was painted on though...

Doesn't the rear cabin of this bike look a lot shorter now than when this bike originally appeared in Davis? I think it may have been recently truncated? Was there some sort of damage to the rear which was removed? It doesn't seem like a good night's sleep can be had in it now.RickEle

Photos

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http://daviswiki.org/Brian_Campbell 2008/02/13

Brian Campbell

Brian is the creater, owner and sole resident of the famous Human Powered Housing Project. He's a really friendly guy and is a great person to strike up a conversation with. He's quite intelligent, after all he did conceive, engineer, and fabricate his own moveable house! He claims to be an "intergalactic refugee", though some may doubt this. He's a regular at Cafe Roma where he sometimes plays the piano for hours on end while his House sits parked outside.

Brian comes and goes. Heck, if your house was moveable, would you keep it in one spot? No. Brian is often around Davis but he does travel near and far. Sometimes he goes on his spiffy bike but it does also get loaded in a truck on occasion. Recently, Brian took a trip down and back to somewhere in Mexico. In Vacaville, they let local school kids create their own newspaper once or twice a year, The Campus Star. Anyway, one kid wrote about Brian and his bike when he was living outside of the Vacaville or Fairfield Target in early 2005. This [WWW]aggie article from 2003 contains a bio of Brian.


http://www.bikeforums.net/archive/index.php/t-141201.html 2008/02/13 rymodee a few years ago i read an article in a magazine (can't remember which one...) about a man who built a housebike. recently i read on the internet that he is still building them and has made about 14 or so. anyone heard of this guy, anyone have one of these beauties. in the article i read it seemed like he was a little paranoid and didn't want to give up too much information, but it seemed like after a few years of building and selling some, i guess he got a patent and loosened up a bit. FlatTop What is it? A bike with a little RV attached? A bike small enough to ride around the house? EDIT: Saw a picture here: http://www.inreverie.org/pics/codependence/House-bike-profile.shtml It's kind of a cross between a recumbent trike and a tiny pioneer conestoga wagon. Cool little thing. primaryreality Is this (http://www.culturechange.org/issue11/brian-campbell-house-bike.htm) what you're talking about? Pretty interesting. rymodee yeah, that auto free times article is the one i read years ago, but i thought i read an update where he was beginning to sell them a little more or at least share a photo...oh well, maybe i'll call the number and see what's going on. thanks for that article! Bart5657 Wow, this sounds like one of the most fascinating ideas I have ever heard. If anyone could provide a link with some more information or even a photo I would be greatly indebted. 531phile why would he patent the idea and then not make an effort to market it by at least having a cell phone number or a way to get in contact with him. He's going to lose that patent in 15 years so he better get going. cranky Here (http://daviswiki.org/Human_Powered_Housing_Project) is another house bike, more info (http://www.californiaaggie.com/article/?id=831) Mehow Omg! :eek: That's going to be me after college! Darren why would he patent the idea and then not make an effort to market it by at least having a cell phone number or a way to get in contact with him.... ...pure speculation on my part here... I bet a well-meaning friend encouraged him to patent it and that he probably didn't care too much either way. From what I've read about him, he doesn't seem the type to care too much about having wealth, at least in the way we probably think of it. In some ways, I envy him and his lifestyle, he's probably one of the richest people around in *real* terms... -Darren BenyBen wow, this sounds amazing. I'd love to meet this guy. FXjohn Here (http://daviswiki.org/Human_Powered_Housing_Project) is another house bike, more info (http://www.californiaaggie.com/article/?id=831) He taught himself mechanical engineering and has pedaled his home over 100,000 miles. Or so it reads on the back of his bicycle. Next to the mileage, written in marker, are the words "Quit Oil." Campbell said he's in a class of his own when he travels. He claims to be able to pedal his home at highway speeds. LOL...get real! 100,000 miles..highway speeds!! MarkS It doesn't mention how it does on *hills*. The sad thing is, I think I had a chance to see one of these vehicle and maybe the designer. But it was parked in a derelict part of town, and we drove on.
http://bikeportland.org/2007/08/30/update-on-camper-bike/ 2008/02/13

Updated: Motorhome-biker shares his story

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Editor) on August 30th, 2007 at 8:12 pm

[NOTE: This post has been updated since last night. Please hit your refresh button to make sure you are seeing the full story.] brian camper bike-2 Brian (Photos by Jonathan Maus)

Like most of you who read the story about how the famous motorhome-bike was destroyed Wednesday night, I instantly assumed it was the work of vandals.

But as the day wore on, evidence mounted that the bikes creator, Brian, might have done it himself: a commenter who has spent time with him said hed been wanting to trash it and start from scratch; Ayleen Crotty reported that he needed help with repairs; and Jonathon Severdia, who wrote an article about Brian for WorldChanging called to tell me he wouldnt be surprised if Brian did it.

Despite all this, I didnt want to jump to conclusions until I heard what happened directly from Brian.

Fortunately last night, on my way to catch the B:C:Clettes at the Clown House on Alberta, I happened to see Brian entering the Safeway at MLK Blvd. and NE Ainsworth.

Nothing ever lines up for me, no jobs, no nothingIm invisible out here, like a ghost. People only notice me now that this happened. Brian

I felt awkward introducing myself to him. No matter what the circumstances are around his bike, I knew he might not be in the best mood right now. Not to mention, I was a complete stranger.

At the outset of our conversation, things did not look good. I quickly realized he had destroyed the bike himself and he was mumbling and going on about how sick and tired he was of everything: living on the street; living in his camper; not finding work; not having many friends; being hungry; and so on.

He didn't really look me in the eye and he was angry, frustrated and depressed.

I let Brian know that while I couldn't relate to his experiences, I could understand why he felt angry and bitter at the world. Mixed in with my empathy, I let him know that there was a community of people who cared about him and who were willing to help; but only if he wanted it.

As we walked back to the site of his tattered bike, the warm breeze blew the wayward pieces of tattered foam all over the street. He had a few plastic trash bags and I asked for one to help him clean up the mess.

As we picked up bits of glass, metal, and foam, the picture of Brians breakdown became clearer.

After decades of traveling the country in his camper-bike and living a seemingly carefree, nomadic existence, Brian had had enough.

Still upset, he said, Nothing ever lines up for me, no jobs, no nothing I'm invisible out here, like a ghost. People only notice me now that this happened.

I offered (and he agreed) that perhaps people mistakenly assumed he was happy and content with his existence. After all, he was free-and-clear, without the stresses of work, mortgages, and other rat-race responsibilities. He was on an eternal bike tour, living off the land under his own powerhow bad could that be?

As we talked, many people would honk and wave as they drove by.

He explained that last winter he reached a breaking point. The dark, cold, wet days found him "just lying there, in my cabin, staring out, losing weight from not eating." "I can't do that anymore, he said I felt like I was in jail in that thing, trapped..."

He pointed out mold that was spreading through sections of the cabins foam walls and expressed concern about breathing it in.

Despite his anxieties over the state of his life, I noticed that the more we spoke, the more stable, and less upset he became. Slowly but surely the fog around his mood began to lift. Eventually the conversation turned to how he could get rolling again and he even started joking and smiling.

With a huge grin he said, "This is what happens when you build a camper thats not big enough for a woman."

I told Brian that if he was interested, I would help him raise some money and maybe even have a little work party. He said he definitely wants to rebuild, "I can get this all fixed in just a couple of days." Staring at his bike and thinking of rebuilding, he said, "It will be like the big family argument that gets better when you buy a new car and everyone's happy." That "joke" is actually a true story from Brian's past. He told me about a big "blowout fight" between his mom and dad. Then, the next morning he noticed a brand new car in the driveway, and the house was silent and everyone seemed OK. With a confused look and a sheepish grin, he said, "I could never figure that one out."

I was relieved that his spirits seemed to be getting brighter. At this point, he was talking less of his frustrations and sadness, and more about how he could get rolling again.

Brian said he could re-build his camper for around $200 in supplies. Heres a list of what he needs:

Before I left, I wrote my name and phone number down and told him to stay in touch (he said he would). I offered my backyard as a backup place to crash if he needed it (hes currently got a place to stay that's off the streets).

Then, at his request, I went to Safeway and bought him a 40 oz. of Pabst and two cans of spaghetti.

If I do hear from Brian, and if there's sufficient interest from the community (which I think there will be), I will coordinate a work party to happen in the next few days. Stay tuned to this post for more details.

In the meantime, I've created this PayPal button for anyone who wants to make online donations. All proceeds will go to help Brian rebuild his bike (and maybe a show of support from the community will help him rebuild his zeal and outlook on life as well.)

UPDATE: As of today (8/31) at 4:15 pm, we have raised $515.00 for Brian. Wow. Stay tuned for more info

UPDATE: Weve set up a work party for tomorrow. If youd like to join us, meet Brian, and show your support, come to the Walgreens parking lot at MLK Blvd. and NE Ainsworth at 3:00 tomorrow, on Saturday, 9/1. Email This Post


[X]   [X]   [X]   [X]   [X]   [X]   [X]  
http://www.carectomy.com/index.php/Bikes/Man-Made-Man-Powered-Mobile-Home-Takes-Portland 2008/02/13 http://www.carectomy.com/index.php/Bikes/Man-Made-Man-Powered-Mobile-Home-Takes-Portland Written by Kate Trainor Tuesday, 29 January 2008 [X]

We know that bikes are ideal for commuting -- but for camping, too? Brian Campbell, a car-free vagabond whos pedaled across the U.S. and Mexico, built his own camping cabin and attached it to his bike. The sturdy contraption snakes behind his back wheel like a sleek Airstream trailer, and offers similar comforts. Brian has lived and traveled in his hand-made mobile home for many years and, most recently, made a pit stop in Portland.

Brian built his makeshift motor home from mag wheels, Styrofoam panels, and duct tape. Regardless of the raw materials used to build it, Brians bike is ingeniously engineered. This man-powered moho looks more like a streamlined, metallic spaceship than a handyman specialalthough its duct tape that holds it all together. As reported by Bike Portland:

He said his design was inspired by the moon rovers and the moon landing vehicle, the super structure and the shiny panels. The interior was sweet too, looked comfy, and had a map holder and lots of neat nooks and crannies to store stuff.

Shortly after Bike Portland first published their story on Brian and his camper-bike, a reader wrote in to announce that it was time for Brian to build a newer, more efficient model.

Hes got ambitious plans to build another such ship this one is his third! but hes low on scratch and materials. Although his machine is impressively well-designed, he says its showing its age and hes not sure whether to repair or replace at this point. Nevertheless, its his home for the winter.

Eventually, Brian became so frustrated by the dilapidation of his bike-powered home-on-wheels, he destroyed it.

He explained that last winter he reached a breaking point. The dark, cold, wet days found him just lying there, in my cabin, staring out, losing weight from not eating. I cant do that anymore, he said I felt like I was in jail in that thing, trapped He pointed out mold that was spreading through sections of the cabins foam walls and expressed concern about breathing it in. With a huge grin he said, This is what happens when you build a camper thats not big enough for a woman.

Word got out to Portlands bicycling community, and within days, the web site raised over $500 and rallied a group of supporters to help Brian re-build. Were not sure where Brian is now, but were hopeful that hes happy, and that his freewheeling home is re-built and back in action.

Photo via flickr by Joseph Robertson.


http://crasch.livejournal.com/260254.html Previous Entry Add to Memories Tell a Friend Next Entry http://www.omsi.edu/bikeusa/log/0602.htm "...After Bike-E, we stopped at a cafe and met this other guy on a house-bike! The most incredible thing I've ever seen on two wheels! This guy, Brian, built a 20 foot house on two wheels. Granted the house part is the size of a two-man tent, but it was still incredible! All styrofoam and aluminum. He had a moped wheel in front and a Nissan wheel in back. The front wheel was attached to a generator which recharged a battery. When he needed to, he could flip a switch and the whole thing would be motorized. He claims to have gone 73 miles an hour on this thing! He's been living out of this house-bike for 5 years now, and this is his 13th model (the last one burned up in a fire). Absolutely amazing!..."
http://carfreeuniverse.org/Members/colin/davis/ Added by colin #441 on 2004-10-02. Last modified 2004-10-09 18:42. Originally created 2004-10-02. F0 License: Attribution Location: World, United States, California, Davis Topics: boosterism, ecovillages [...] Happy with what I'd seen of Davis (it was a place worth returning to), I contemplated catching the next train to Berkeley, but on the way back to the station, I decided to try to find the Davis Food Co-op, as I'd seen some their ads in the papers I picked up. And parked by the side of the food co-op, near the railroad tracks, were two housebikes. I think I'd seen a housebike back in 1998 when I visited Arcata for two weeks, thinking about living there. Or maybe I'd only seen the picture that is on the cover of Auto-Free Times issue 11. I signed and put two of my business cards in a place where they would be noticed on the bikes. I hung around there long enough that Devin emerged from one of the bikes and I asked if he was in a talkative mood, and he was. He let me crawl inside his house, and I was amazed at how cool it was, since Brian Campbell had taken the shady spot. But the RMAX 1-inch insulating material Devin's box was made of, plus the heat shield on the roof kept it pleasant inside. He also showed me how he made a lamp, several of which could be combined to make a little stove, from machined aluminum, that he filled with vegetable oil. A very small bit of oil, maybe three tablespoons it looked like, would fill the reservoir that Devin said would let the wick burn all night. Devin said he was Campbell's apprentice, and that he'd been living in his housebike for three months. He said Campbell had been in Davis for two years, and that they'd decided that weatherwise, cheap bike parts wise, and flat terrain wise, Davis was the place for them to be. For food, apparently the co-op they were currently parked next to had plenty of leftovers. Actually, I added that part about flat terrain. Devin assured me Campbell could manage SF-steep hills on his bike. Devin told me I should go back over to campus and check out the Davis Domes. He gave me general directions and said that anyone in the vicinity should be able to help me find them. Hiking back to campus, I stopped by the city swim pool and found out about the masters swimming program, and I was able to take a needed shower. I also stopped by the city hall, where there is a real-life version of the high-wheeler bicycle that you see in the city logos. [...]
http://flickr.com/photos/whitespace/871236573/ [X] When I saw this, it looked like a lunar lander. On 6th Avenue! http://flickr.com/photos/whitespace/871247325/in/photostream/ [X] Brian built this bike himself, and can go more than 200 km in a day. He's nearly always on the road, he said. This man had some fit legs.
http://www.spoems.com/video_8PsTyvWy5e8.html 2008/02/13 "A Hong Kong designer has come up with a novel way to beat the city's soaring housing prices and cramped living conditions. The tricycle home may be small, but it comes with a door, a window, a writing desk and a fold out bed." [Video on youtube]
http://youtube.com/watch?v=Uyn8J8-q8EM Video of Brian's house bike
http://bikeportland.org/2009/08/24/a-visit-from-motorhome-bike-builder-brian-campbell/ as of 2010/03.

A visit from motorhome bike builder Brian Campbell

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) on August 24th, 2009 at 3:33 pm (Photos © J. Maus)

This morning I looked our office window and saw a familiar bike pedaling by. It was Brian Campbell and his massive motorhome/camper bike. A few minutes later he had swung around and parked for a quick chat.

It’s been almost three years since I first shared a Portland sighting of Brian Campbell and his amazing camper bike. Then, back in August 2007, I shared the sad news that his home had been destroyed. Initially reported as the work of vandals, it turned out Brian did it himself in a bout with depression and frustration. Years of living on the street had caught up to him.

After I shared his story, the community responded big time. Brian wanted to rebuild his bike and his life and BikePortland readers raised nearly $1,000 in just a few days. With the money in hand, I took Brian to the hardware store and helped him load up on supplies. After a work party, he spent the next few weeks parked in front of our house on N. Michigan, working long hours to build a new, improved, and more spacious bike home.

After several more weeks, his creation was road-worthy and it was time for Brian to move on.

Since then he’s built several other motorhome bikes (including one for local tall-bike riding performer Dingo the Clown), but sales have not been brisk enough to get off the street.

It was good to see him this morning. He told me he’s looking for work at a bike shop and he hopes to get some steady income. He dreams of building bike homes for others in hopes of a fully human-powered future. He also talks about a revolutionary, electricity-generating invention. But I think he knows both of those enterprises won’t get him off the streets any time soon.

Brian needs some help, but I’m not sure how best to give it. People love his bike-motorhome creations and he draws a crowd wherever he goes. But a person needs much more than just curious onlookers to stay sane and healthy. I hope Brian stays well... until next time he pedals through.

— Check out our “Brian Campbell” photo tag for more images of Brian and his bike (including the rebuild).

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http://tinyhouseblog.com/tiny-house/brians-bike-motorhome as of 2010/03

Brian’s Bike Motorhome

Posted August 25th, 2009 by Kent Griswold and filed in Tiny House Articles, Tiny House Concept Tags: Bike Motorhome, BikePortland, Brian Campbell, Tiny House Articles, Tiny House Concept 8 Comments

Brent from Hillsboro, Oregon and Logan from Sacramento, California both sent me a link to this article yesterday and I wanted to share it with you.

Brian Campbell is a homeless inventor who lives in Portland, Oregon who has built himself a "mortorhome" that is powered by manpower.

This is the second incarnation of Brian's invention, as his first one was ruined. The BikePortland readers raised a $1,000 to help Brian fund his new home. Jonathan Maus editor of BikePortland let Brian build his new and improved home in his front yard.

Brian has built several more of these for customers in the last couple of years. Unfortunately, there is not enough business to keep Brian off the street.

Brian is looking for work at a bike shop and he hopes to get some steady income. He dreams of building bike homes for others in hopes of a fully human-powered future.

Read the article on the BikePortland website. Check out another cool bike trailer house on the Tiny House Design site.

Photo Credits: BikePortland

[bikemotorhome.jpg]   [Brian.jpg]   [bikemotorhome2.jpg]   [inside.jpg]  

http://projectrollingfreedom.com/2009/11/29/brians-bike-motorhome/ as of 2010/03.

Brian’s bike motorhome!

Hey kids! I know it’s been FOREVER since I posted. No excuses, I’m just lazy. Anyway, I found this over at BikePortland.org; and I thought I’d weigh in.

There’s been a lot of talk recently about building homes for the homeless. All these fancy architecture students are coming up with these fabulous plans for these fabulous tiny houses and after I read about Brian’s bike motorhome, it got me thinking that there are 3 fundamental problems with these architecture students’ plans: 1) many of them are big enough that you need either a peice of property to set them on or a huge truck to pull them or a lot of money to buy the plans and build them (or buy them prebuilt). 2) nobody is really giving these plans away for free (except Michael Janzen) or really getting off their patuties (myself included) to help build these homes. 3) homeless people don’t have the money to spend on purchasing these plans or the homes premade or to build these homes. Period. These homes are beautiful and well designed, however, they don’t really suit the needs of the homeless. They need something cheap. Something that is easy to take with them by hand or bike; something light and fairly small like Michael’s teardrop bike trailer or Brian’s bike motorhomes. I also think the fastest way to help the homeless is to support them. Take Brian for example. He currently has a pull behind bike trailer that weighs 80lbs for sale. It’s definately not as pretty as one of the fabulous tiny houses but it is small, light, weatherproof and can be tugged along easily. So in that regard, it serves the needs of the homeless. So since it’s almost December and all, I’m going to whip out the Christmas card and say, even if you don’t want this tiny house for yourself, why not purchase it and then donate it to someone who really needs it? Brian probably needs the money more than those fancy architecture students do. He actually lives on the streets. He is not neccessarily homeless because of his bike motorhome, however, just because you have a place to sleep doesn’t mean that you are rich. Brian still needs food for his mouth and clothes for his back. And probably money for repairs on his home. So to wrap up my time on my soap box, here is one of the comments by the editor of BikePortland.org: Elly Blue (Editor) November 28th, 2009 16:22 Hey all, I spent a while talking with Brian today. He definitely needs to find a buyer for this rig, and is entertaining offers. In the meantime, he could really use smaller donations as well. If you know where he’s at, drop by and chat with him for a while. If you don’t, feel free to drop it by our office, 833 SE Main #102. Besides money, his other urgent short-term need is a covered place where he can fix his own house-bike — the rear axle needs to be replaced and he isn’t looking forward to working on it out in the rain and cold for another winter. Any leads on a big, covered, preferably indoor area where he could work? In the longer term, the guy needs investors, and a team. And here also are some pictures of Brian’s bike motorhome that he has for sale. This model is 8′ x 4′ and weighs only 80 pounds. It has a spacious interior that fits a sleeping adult (or two?), has many interior shelves, and is priced to sell (he’s asking $1,950 but says he’ll take offers). He can modify the hitch custom for any bicycle. -quote and photos courtesy of Kent Griswold of the Tiny House Blog [biketrailer1-600x401.jpg]   [biketrailer4-600x401.jpg]   [biketrailer6-600x401.jpg]   [biketrailer10-600x401.jpg]   [brians-bike-trailer.jpg]  


http://tinyhouseblog.com/tiny-house-concept/brians-bike-trailer-home/ as of 2010/03

Brian’s Bike Trailer-home Posted November 29th, 2009 by Kent Griswold and filed in Tiny House Concept, Tiny House for Sale Tags: Bike Portland, Brian Campbell, Tiny House Concept, Tiny House for Sale 6 Comments

Dylan alerted me to an update on a story I covered a while back on Brian Campbell and his bike motorhome. Brian is the man known far and wide for his amazing RV bike.

Jonathan Maus editor of Bike Portland says: Now, not only has Brian rebuilt his own bike-home, he’s also started making them for others. But, Brian’s business is far from being stable. He needs help to keep building them and he’s looking for customers. [biketrailer8-600x401.jpg]  

Unlike his bike, which is nothing short of a pedal-powered motorhome, the one he has for sale currently is a pull-behind trailer. Brian has perfected the fabrication of an all-weather enclosure that is light, insulated, very stable, and road worthy. This model is 8′ x 4′ and weighs only 80 pounds. It has a spacious interior that fits a sleeping adult (or two?), has many interior shelves, and is priced to sell (he’s asking $1,950 but says he’ll take offers). He can modify the hitch custom for any bicycle.

Please go and read the complete article at Bike Portland. [biketrailer1-600x401.jpg]   [biketrailer10-600x401.jpg]   [biketrailer4-600x401.jpg]   [biketrailer6-600x401.jpg]  


http://bikeportland.org/2009/11/25/builder-brian-campbell-has-a-bike-trailer-home-for-you/ as of 2010/03

Builder Brian Campbell has a bike trailer-home for you

Posted by Jonathan Maus (Publisher/Editor) on November 25th, 2009 at 12:48 pm Brian Campbell's Trailer for Sale-4 Brian Campbell is selling this trailer home. (A weather-proof siding is yet to be added). (Photos © J. Maus)

The Thanksgiving holiday is all about home for many people. For Brian Campbell, home has been a bicycle for over thirty years.

Brian is the man known far and wide for his amazing RV bike. He's traveled with it throughout the country, over mountain passes and at speeds of up to 70 mph (thanks to an ingenious flywheel apparatus he has invented). We first reported about Brian landing in Portland three years ago.

Since then he's struggled with depression brought on by frustration with life on the street (among other things). After he destroyed his bike, we (the community) raised money so he could rebuild it.

Now, not only has Brian rebuilt his own bike-home, he's also started making them for others. But, Brian's business is far from being stable. He needs help to keep building them and he's looking for customers. I recently stopped by Brian's current home/workspace (a vacant lot near SE Stephens and 9th) to see the newly built trailer he has for sale.

Unlike his bike, which is nothing short of a pedal-powered motorhome, the one he has for sale currently is a pull-behind trailer. Brian has perfected the fabrication of an all-weather enclosure that is light, insulated, very stable, and road worthy. This model is 8' x 4' and weighs only 80 pounds. It has a spacious interior that fits a sleeping adult (or two?), has many interior shelves, and is priced to sell (he's asking $1,950 but says he'll take offers — UPDATE 12/16: If no one buys the trailer by tomorrow he says he'll "junk it". All offers considered). He can modify the hitch custom for any bicycle.

Brian also says his trailers would be perfect as food cart or mobile bike businesses. Check out the slideshow below for more photos. If you are interested in learning more about Brian's work, or if you'd like to buy this trailer, get in touch with us and we'll connect you with him (he doesn't have a cell phone or email address, but he stops by our office regularly).

[4098346575_b743895cd7_o.jpg]   [4099101082_67d7c892b5_o.jpg]   [4098347095_bb484d9cea_o.jpg]   [4099101698_b95945431a_o.jpg]   [4098347719_195b33b748_o.jpg]   [4099102228_5eaebf3551_o.jpg]   [4098348309_b61aa4a7af_o.jpg]   [4098348501_b4b241a71f_o.jpg]   [4098348699_87b657e1df_o.jpg]   [4098348911_cd6e409068_o.jpg]   [4099103442_f483464b32_o.jpg]  

From http://omahgarsh.blogspot.com/2009/12/brian-campbell-housebike-if-you-are.html as of 2010/03

Friday, December 11, 2009

BRIAN CAMPBELL HOUSEBIKE !!!!!!! If YOU are a modern day NOMAD,this is the bike for YOU !!!!!! This tremendous creation was built by Brian Campbell. It is a bolt together Housetrike made from aluminum,bike parts,A car rear wheel,etc.,etc.Pretty wild EH ??!!!!! To find out more about Brian and his wonderful rolling imagination pieces type his name into the search box at http://bikeportland.org.

[Brian%2BCampbell%2BHousebike-4.JPG]   [Brian%2BCampbell%2BHousebike-1.JPG]   [Brian%2BCampbell%2BHousebike-2.JPG]   [Brian%2BCampbell%2BHousebike-3.JPG]  

[This appears to be a Brian Campbell creation, but it looks "not lived in" like maybe one he built for somebody else?]


water-tight, these homes are ingeniously made from found materials and lots of welded and taped metal pieces. more information about brian and his bikes can be found on Bike Portland [thanks m-horton for the link!]

[jb2.09_bikehome01.JPG]   [jb2.10_bikehome02.JPG]  
http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2006/06/22/collapsible-bike-trailer-has-comfortable-bunk-for-camper/ 2010/03

Collapsible Bike Trailer Has Comfortable Bunk for Camper (Jul, 1935)

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Collapsible Bike Trailer Has Comfortable Bunk for Camper A COLLAPSIBLE bicycle trailer which can be converted into comfortable sleeping quarters has been built by Joseph Do-rocke, 25-year-old Chicago youth. With it he intends to make an 8-months bicycle tour of America, retiring at night in his ingenious sleeping compartment.

The trailer resembles a box camera with an extended bellows. Ready for travel, the 50-pound outfit measures only four feet long and two feet square. It is supported on the road by two standard bicycle wheels.

When an inner compartment is pulled out, the enclosed bed extends to eight feet, furnishing sufficient space for the average person. The roof is hinged and may be closed in case of adverse weather.



http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2007/06/11/family-of-three-travels-in-home-built-cyclemobile/ 2010/03

Family Of Three Travels In Home-Built “Cyclemobile” (Feb, 1938)

[cyclomobile.jpg]  

TWO bicycles joined together by means of a specially constructed frame and covered by a streamlined, water-proofed canvas hood, serve as a novel and cheap medium of transportation for A. Martin, of Dracutt, Mass. Dry batteries supply current to operate the front and rear lights of the “cyclemobile,” as the odd vehicle has been named.

Resembling an automobile of radical design in its appearance, the cyclemobile’s hood boasts ising-glass windows. The interior is fitted with luggage compartments and a berth for Martin’s 18-month-old daughter. Husband and wife work dual sets of pedals.

[[Ising-glass is probably aka isinglass, which is apparently 'muscovite', a form of mica often found in sheets. The sheets are usually thin and slighlty elastic. Modern uses include replacements for antique stove windows, 0.003" to 0.006" thick and for other uses from 0.025mm (0.001") to 0.30mm (0.012") and in sheets up to 20"x20". "Isinglass" is also used to describe vinyl. Isinglass is also used to describe a transparent collagen (gelatin) from fish bladders, used in glues, jellies, for preserving chicken eggs (not to be confused with waterglass) and as a clarifying agent. It is not clear if it can be dried to make a transparent sheet.]]


http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2009/11/19/70-year-old-tourist-crosses-u-s-on-bicycle/ 2010/03

70-YEAR OLD TOURIST CROSSES U. S. ON BICYCLE (Jan, 1929)

Modern Mechanix

[old_biker.jpg]  

AN ORDINARY bicycle with a special baggage support above the front wheel is the equipment used by M. C. Plummer of Portland, Maine, in touring the United States. Mr. Plummer is 70 years old but he covers from 50 to 150 miles every day on his bicycle, depending on the weather and the nature of the country to be traveled. The sack of bedding, food and clothing which he carries on his handlebars weighs 80 pounds but is so well balanced that the 70-year old tourist has no difficulty in controlling his two-wheeled automobile. Mr. Plummer recommends this system of traveling as a health builder. He does not try to cover any specified distance each day, but sleeps wherever he happens to find himself at sunset.

[[The horzontal/curved band is probably a spare tire. Note fenders, inch-pitch chain.]]


http://blog.modernmechanix.com/2007/05/17/cyclist-takes-bed-along-in-homemade-trailer/ 2010/03

Cyclist Takes Bed Along in Homemade Trailer (Oct, 1940)

Popular Science

[bed_trailer.jpg]  

TOWING his sleeping quarters behind him in a compact trailer, an eighteen-year-old cyclist of Menominee, Mich., recently traveled nearly 1,200 miles to Boston, Mass., economically and comfortably. Post cards that he sold to curious spectators paid for his supplies during the fourteen-day journey. Streamline in shape, the sturdy trailer is a homemade product of his own design. He is shown above demonstrating his sleeping quarters to an admiring hotel doorman.


http://www.freeyourbike.blogspot.com/ 2010/03/14 Saturday, September 23, 2006

BICYCLE TRAILER CAMP BED

Many folk asked us for Bamboo Trailer plans for this years Burning Man. This is a photo of one Bamboo Bicycle Trailer that ended up as a camp bed.

[bamboo%20bed.jpg]  

Its basically a bamboo trailer that has been stretched longer, and then an A frame has been built over the load bed to create a tent with funky fabric.

This is Greg, the guy who built it.

[bamboo%20bed%202.jpg]  

Burning man is an annual art festival and temporary community based on radical self expression and self-reliance in the Black Rock Desert of Nevada.


http://www.carryfreedom.com/bamboo.html 2010/03

Bamboo bicycle trailer Build a DIY bicycle trailer from these free plans. There is no welding to be done, and no tube bending. Make it any size, from any material, even bamboo.

The problem - A bicycle trailer is a great way to carry things by bicycle, but many people simply cannot afford to buy a bicycle trailer like my Y-Frame. It is often the people with the least money who would benefit the most from a bicycle trailer.

A Solution - I designed the Bamboo Trailer to be easy to make from cheap materials, without too much skill or too many tools. Its easy to adapt the basic trailer to fit a wide range of cargo and materials.

Why - By making a trailer yourself you are taking control, what it can be is only limited by your imagination and enthusiasm. The value is not in the trailer itself, but in the knowledge of how to make a trailer. In a sense you will always have a bicycle trailer in your head if you ever need one. This knowledge makes you a richer person, and the world a richer place.

How - The first time you make a trailer will take 2-3 days as you gather materials, make mistakes, and learn. The next time you make one it will take about a day, and it will work much better.

But - Bamboo Trailers are generally less reliable, heavier and less efficient than a shop bought trailer, and if you put a price on your time they often work out more expensive. [P_Bamboo_FL_Line.gif]   [N_Bamboo_Koln.jpg]  

[[Note diagonal "strap" pieces, by using a column you get a nearly flat floor with very little materials. It may be desirable to use straps at eight positions instead of 4 for better support. The forward part of the hitch is simple to make, but may tend to "snag" on passing items. Perpahs put the side-sticking piece at 45 degrees, which would still clear the back tire, but tend to "bounce" off of things rather than catch.]]


http://www.flickr.com/photos/lindseykuper/2551185031/ 2010/03 [2551185031_c584d3f191_o.jpg]  

This guy has a bike trailer big enough to sleep in. It appears to be built out of aluminum, cardboard, and duct tape, and it's totally awesome.


The following is a commercial product. Reviews online (Amazon.com, YouTube video by a customer) suggests the trailer wheel supports are fragile and will fall apart after very little use. (Also larger single wheels probably have less rolling drag.) However, this "pop-up trailer" idea is similar in spirit to some other trailers here and may be inspirational.

From http://store.kamprite.com/catalog/Midget-Bushtrekka-p-16143.html as of 2013/07.

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Midget Bushtrekka
SKU MTC202
Quantity in stock 89 item(s) available
Weight 45.00 lbs

Price: US$ 499.00

Take a closer look at the BUSHTREKKA and you will find a product that has been developed specifically for bicycle touring. The trailer frame itself has features that set it apart from any other trailer on the market.

Take for example the pivoting wheelset. By utilising two wheels under each side of the trailer, harnessed to a pivoting rocker frame, the trailer can easily absorb most of the uneven terrain in its environment. Additional to this, each set of wheels operates independently of the other, creating a clutter free underbelly on the trailer. By adjusting the positioning of each pivot frame vertically, the ride height of the unit can be adjusted for bikes from 20" up to 29".

Storage is also at a maximum for this trailer. By using every piece of available space, we've created three main storage compartments with over 41 gallons (180 litres) of storage. Easy access at all times, even when set up, ensures you have what you need, when you need it.

Our trailer also features fully adjustable levelling jacks to ensure no matter what terrain your setting up on, the unit can be presented to a horizontal position for sleeping comfort.

Couple the trailer with the remarkable features of the Oversize or Original Tentcot and you are seriously set to travel. The TentCot conventienly folds away atop the trailer with its own waterproof cover to suit.

There is nothing else quite like this trailer. It is the bicycle tourists best companion.

Dimensions of the "MIDGET BUSHTREKKA":

Specifications (mm)USA Specification (in)
Bed Size: 2200 L x 810 W 90" L x 32" W
Tent Size: 2200 L x 810 W x 1000 H 90" L x 32" W x 40" H
Trailer Dimensions 860 L x 1100 W x 200 H 35" W x 44" L x 8" H
Weight: 26 kg 56 lbs

Standard Inclusions :

[Note the Tentcot is 9 kgf and the Oversize Tentcot is 11 kgf.] [Note the trailer hitch might be hard to use with "Breeze-in"-style dropouts..]